Last edited by Gulmaran
Wednesday, May 6, 2020 | History

2 edition of Soil and hydrologic factors affecting stability of natural slopes in the Oregon Coast Range found in the catalog.

Soil and hydrologic factors affecting stability of natural slopes in the Oregon Coast Range

Carlton S. Yee

Soil and hydrologic factors affecting stability of natural slopes in the Oregon Coast Range

by Carlton S. Yee

  • 266 Want to read
  • 17 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Slopes (Soil mechanics).

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Carlton Stratton Yee.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination[18], 204 leaves, bound :
    Number of Pages204
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14238497M

    A brief state-of-the-art review of the effects water on slope stability and techniques for analysis is presented. The effective stress principle and basic considerations of slope stability, including design factors of safety, are discussed briefly. The derivations and effects of seepage forces and rapidCited by: 8. rangeland health assessments are 1) Soil and Site Stability 2) Hydrologic Function 3) Biotic Integrity. What is soil? Soil is the unconsolidated mineral or organic material on the immediate surface of the Earth that serves as a natural medium for the growth of land plants. It consists of mineral particles of different sizes (sand, silt, and.

    The Envirolok system stabilizes the soil, allowing vegetation to establish and flourish. Envirolok is ideal for slopes from 1V:2H to near vertical slopes. For slopes below 4’ in height, Envirolok has a variety of gravity and tie-back methods to achieve permanent vegetative stabilization. the estimated changes in soil saturation and root strength on slope stabil- ity. Stability calculations were made for each of the 34 piezometer sites in cedar-decline areas using observed values of soil depth, saturated. frac- tion of soil, and slope angle. Constant values of soil cohesive strength (8Cited by: 3.

    They are certainly major factors in cut slope stability and in the stability of fill slopes involving both “internal” and “external” slope failures. The effect of water on cut and fill slope stability is briefly discussed below. • Importance of Water Next to gravity, water is the File Size: 1MB. The active and passive forces are defined using standard earth pressure theory (e.g., used to analyze retaining wall stability), but including cohesion in the upslope/downslope wedges and an inclined soil layer appropriate for natural slopes. Classical soil mechanics theory includes three primary methods of active and passive earth pressure Cited by:


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Soil and hydrologic factors affecting stability of natural slopes in the Oregon Coast Range by Carlton S. Yee Download PDF EPUB FB2

Two major cohesionless soil series of the central Coast Ranges of Oregon were examined for soil and hydrologic properties. Although derived from different parent material, the Bohannon and Klickitat series exhibited nearly identical values of soil and hydrologic properties. Aggregation in both soils was found to be the most important property, for it influences shear strength Cited by: The three attributes – soil stability, hydrologic function, and integrity of the biotic community – are also used as a common description of the quality of land.

Soil Stability Soil stability is the capacity of a land to limit the redistribution and loss of soil resources by wind and water. Open Library is an open, editable library catalog, building towards a web page for every book ever published.

Author of Effect of wetting mode on shear strength of two aggregated soils, Soil and hydrologic factors affecting stability of natural slopes in the Oregon Coast Range.

Slope stability refers to the condition of inclined soil or rock slopes to withstand or undergo stability condition of slopes is a subject of study and research in soil mechanics, geotechnical engineering and engineering geology.

Slope stability analyses include static and dynamic, analytical or empirical methods to evaluate the stability of earth and rock-fill dams, embankments. The slope angle The angle of internal friction of the soil The soil void ratio Any additional load on the soil surface q combined with the dynamic hydrologic conditions that are characterized by the saturated thickness of the soil above the failure plane h, and The unsaturated zone soil moisture Sw About this book Published by the American Geophysical Union as part of the Water Resources Monograph Series, Volume This monograph compiles research findings on soil mass movement into a format usable by practitioners and students.

Field and Laboratory Hydraulic Characterization of Landslide-Prone Soils in the Oregon Coast Range and Implications for Hydrologic Simulation. and divergent hill slopes (Fig. 1B). Soil samples.

Soil Bioengineering for Slope Stability Introduction Soil bioengineering can be an effective means of treating eroding surfaces and unstable surficial soil layers in the forest environment. Soil bioengineering is a term that describes the use of living plant materials to build structures that provide slope support.

A knowledge of slope. Stability Charts for Uniform Slopes Radoslaw L. Michalowski, 1 Abstract: While computational tools have made most graphical methods and charts obsolete, stability charts for slopes are still routinely used in practice.

The charts presented here are based on the kinematic approach of limit analysis that leads to a strict lower bound on.

Portions of the Oregon Coast Range are highly dissected with narrow ridgetops, steep slopes (32–47°), and local re - lief typically less than m (Fig. reduced soil suction on slope stability with increases in rainfall.

The specific objectives of this study are as follows: 1. Develop a combined hydrology and slope stability model to model changes in pore water pressure due to rainfall infiltration, evaporation, and surface water retention. Characteristics of cohesionless soils affecting the stability of slopes and earth sills, in Contributions to Soil Mechanics, –, Boston Society of Civil Engineers.

Chagnon, S. (ed.) ().Author: Ning Lu, Jonathan W. Godt. Factors Affecting Soil Erosion. It is impossible to play-down the importance of preventing soil erosion, but like many problems before you can address it you first have to understand it. There are several factors which effect how rapid a soil will erode.

In this broadcast I would like to share these factors with you and briefly discuss them. Detailed reviews of the wide range of remedial methods used in improving the stability of slopes are given by Hutchinson and Zaruba and Mencl.

Hutchinson, J.N. Assessment of the effectiveness of corrective measures in relation to geological conditions and types of slope movement. Parametric studies were carried out to study the effect of groundwater table position, rainfall intensities, and soil properties in affecting slope stability.

Three different groundwater table positions corresponding to the wettest, typical, and driest periods in Singapore and four different rainfall intensities (9, 22, 36, and 80 mm/h) were. Slope stability analysis should be used to determine whether a proposed slope meets the required safety and performance criteria during design.

This type of analysis is also utilized to determine stability conditions of existing natural or constructed slopes and evaluate the influence of proposed remediation methods if required. The definitive guide to the critical issue of slope stability and safety.

Soil Strength and Slope Stability, Second Edition presents the latest thinking and techniques in the assessment of natural and man-made slopes, and the factors that cause them to survive or crumble. Using clear, concise language and practical examples, the book explains the practical aspects of geotechnical engineering.

Abstract: The Slope Stability Reference Guide for National Forests in the United States, 1, pages in three volumes, covers stability of both soil and rock slopes. It was written by 23 authors, who are present or former Forest Service engineering geologists, geotechnical engineers and geomorphologists, as an attempt to capture the technical.

Or, the critical height for dry cohesive soil slope is given by – Reframing Eq. (), we get – where S n is called the stability number, defined by Eq. () for an infinite cohesive soil slope. Factor of Safety for a Submerged Cohesive Soil Slope: Factor of safety.

Introduction. Incorporating the vegetation effect in slope stability has been used for many years in geotechnical engineering. The vegetation effect on slope stability usually ignored in conventional slope analysis and it is considered as a minor effects.

Soil nailing is an economic and efficient method to reinforce soils, involving the insertion of threaded bars into natural unstable slope for increasing the overall stability or into cut slopes during the top-down process of excavation. The retained soil.slopes.

3. Hillslope proceses: mass wasting, slope stability and erosion. 4. How vegetation reinforces soil on slopes. 5. Hazard assessment of vegetated slopes. 6. Species selection for soil reinforcement and protection.

7. Ecotechnological solutions for unstable slopes: Ground Bio- and Eco-Engineering techniques and strategies. 8.Soil-geomorphology relations in mountains of Oregon, U.S.A. Geoderma, The development and distribution of soils in the Coast Range and Klamath Mountains are related to geomorphic surfaces and slope by: 6.